Tag Archives: town hall

Roundup

Randy bravely addresses the thorny topic of just how many pillows one man needs and he also offers a chance at a $10 prize just for explaining your choice for smartest U.S. President ever.  I’m going with William Henry Harrison, because by dying 31 days into his term he made the fewest mistakes of any President.

The public option is not dead yet and is still the same Trojan Horse it always was.  And here are 20 errors Obama made in describing the plan.

Abstinence = true feminism — some excerpts:

“The availability of abortion removes the one remaining legitimized reason that women have had for refusing sex besides the headache.”

“Legalized abortion was supposed to grant enormous freedom to women, but it has had the perverse result of freeing men and trapping women.”

Stith writes that MacKinnon’s essay, which was given little credence when it was published, warrants further discussion. He argues that in a competitive sexual marketplace, the number of women willing to have an abortion “reduces an individual woman’s bargaining power.”

“As a result, in order not to lose her guy, she may be pressured into doing precisely what she doesn’t want to do: have unprotected sex, then an unwanted pregnancy, then the abortion she had all along been trying to avoid,” he said.

I think there’s some truth here. I for one have heard men admit they will never wear a condom during sex because there is no shortage of women who’ll oblige their demand for optimal pleasure. It’s sad, but it’s true.

It seems to me, following this logic — and contrary to what many feminists would argue — that the only way to be a true feminist is to make a man wait until marriage to have sex.

More about the differences between Wesleyan Arminianism and Calvinism.  This can get contentious, so play nice, everyone!  My comments there:

One thing I find interesting about the debate is that the critiques both sides use are often superfluous as they cut both ways.  For example, you could say that Calvinism leads to pride (“God chose me!”) or that Wesleyanism leads to pride (“I chose God!) or vice verse with humility (“There is no way I would have chosen God” / “I’m so grateful I had a chance to choose God”).  I try to sift those arguments out as they really don’t prove much.

“When you are at the point of inventing an infinite number of universes to explain the fine-tuning, you’ll know what I am talking about. For every 100 non-Christians who starts to make that speculative multiverse reply to the fine-tuning argument, maybe 1 of you closes his mouth and says “ENOUGH”.”

Well said!  The multiverse theory is an atheist concession speech.  It is a good litmus test to see if they are seriously seeking God or seriously seeking reasons to avoid God.

Roundup

Hi all — I’m phasing back in after moving houses then moving my oldest daughter to where she’ll be dancing with a professional company and going to college part-time.  Nothing like a 1,000 mile trip (each way) dragging a U-Haul 5 days after a house move!

I’m seeing the light at the end of the tunnel, though.  Non-stop unpacking and house projects are almost through.  If a day goes by without a trip to Lowe’s I half expect them to call to see if I’m sick.   Update: I just saw that Lowe’s posted lower than expected earnings for the 2nd Quarter.  If they don’t improve in 3Q then don’t blame me! 

Things went very smoothly overall, and I thank God for that.  Looking forward to getting into regular routines (with a shorter commute!) and some ministry things (teaching a Fireproof / marriage class at church, a Kairos Prison Ministry weekend and a couple other projects). 

Guilty as charged: When you don’t feel forgiven 

Believing you’re forgiven is difficult. But faith is never easy. In fact, it’s impossible for us, and that’s why it’s a grace from God. Cry out to Him for it (Mark 9:24). Confess that you’re having a hard time believing that you’re forgiven, and ask Him to grant you the faith to believe it. Even if your feelings don’t change, your only hope is to take God at his word, and cast yourself on His Son. Believe that all the wrath is gone, and there’s no more condemnation (Romans 8:1). Your Father in heaven is waiting for you, not with an angry frown, but with open arms.  He’ll run to meet you, as sinful as you are. Believe it. Meditate on it. Let it sink in. The result will be unhindered fellowship with your Creator and life transforming gratitude.

The Prosperity Gospel is as nauseating as ever — I was hoping that one of the bright spots of the recession would be to make followers of these false teachers recognize the sham that these “ministries” really are. 

On the one hand, I feel sorry for those duped by these false teachers.  But I also think they get what they deserve.  They want to believe that just sending money to some phony will result in riches for them.  Does it ever occur to them that the “ministers” claiming that God made them rich are only wealthy because they are pulpit pimps who sell a give-to-get scheme?

Does the Left want Obama to be hated so they don’t have to defend his policies?  I still see a fair amount of “you don’t like him because he’s black” comments instead of real debate.  I’d just laugh them off except the topic is so serious.

A good summary of Classical Wesleyan Arminianism vs. Standard Calvinism (though I preferred to refer to it as Reformed Theology as that has less baggage).  There is more in common than you might think. 

This is one of those issues I’ve shifted on over the years, going from mostly Wesleyan to probably 60/40 Reformed.  I view this as a “debate, don’t divide” issue for Christians.  I like hearing well informed scholars on both sides debate this. 

I know this has been around but it is timeless and so telling.  It’s a great video (just a minute long) showing one of the “crazed extremist” health care town hall protesters and the loving, caring, selfless public servant paying close attention to one of her constituents:

Jackson-Lee is from the Houston area so we get to see her a lot.