Tag Archives: judge

Roundup

Perhaps it’s Time the USDA Stopped Giving Us Nutrition Advice?

Something funny happened at the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) last week. In an online newsletter to employees, published once a quarter, the advice dispensed was to embrace Meatless Mondays in USDA cafeterias

Is it possible — just possible — that part of the agency has outlived its usefulness? Maybe the beef industry can stand on its own. And is anyone going to argue that we’d be even more obese and out of shape as a country if not for the work of this agency?  Think of how much influence is bought and sold because of this agency.  Perhaps they should phase out and give the free market a chance.

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Obama keeps saying he has been quoted out of context, but the problem is that the larger the context you look at the more accurate the criticisms are.  Via A younger Obama considered his first employer, “the enemy”:

Obama was a low-level editor in Reference Services, working on reports describing economic conditions in various foreign countries. By all accounts, he disliked the work, not just because it was pedestrian and boring, but because it was in business.

“He calls it working for the enemy,” Obama’s mother, Ann, wrote after a phone conversation with her son, “because some of the reports are written for commercial firms that want to invest in [Third World] countries.”

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8 Ways Blacks Perpetuate Racism and the Only Way to Thwart It — “Morgan Freeman and Chris Rock are among the offenders.” — a great read.

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A good distinction that Pastor D.L. Foster noted on Facebook.  Keep this in mind the next time someone accuses you of judging (right after you point out that they are hypocrites for judging you for judging).

The bible tells us not to judge the wicked, but to warn them that their sins will draw the judgment of God. Warning and judging are not the same.

Warn: to give notice or bring attention to beforehand especially of danger to come

Judge: to pronounce sentence on another without the authority to do so.

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The President asks for a big round of applause for a king of gay p*rn.  He’ll do anything for those who give him money.

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The Colorado shooting tragedy could have been much less deadly if people had been armed.  There is a reason you probably haven’t heard about this shooting, where the number of dead was much lower.  Why?  Because a woman there was armed.

Oh, the hypocrisy!

A recent commenter did all she could to avoid the topic of a post and railed at length about the hypocrisy of Christians. 

Critics have a point when they demonstrate where some Christians are hypocritical.  After all, Jesus taught to judge but not to judge hypocritically.

But unless the critics are just pointing out the hypocrisy of some Christians as mere trivia, then the critics become judges and hypocrites themselves. 

Think about it: If they reject the Bible, then what is their grounding for claiming that judging and hypocrisy are wrong? 

Even if they could provide a grounding outside the Bible that judging is wrong (they can’t, of course, but that’s a different problem for them), then they are guilty of judging Christians for judging. 

And of course, if they judge others for the (ungrounded) universal sin of judging, then they are hypocrites.

They judge people for hypocrisy when they are hypocrites as well, so they are double hypocrites.

Do they see the irony?  Do they realize their own hypocrisy?  In my experience they don’t.  They are too busy avoiding the central issues of the debate and they use the hypocrisy charge to position themselves as morally superior to Christians.

A friend used to complain a lot about hypocrites in the church.  I conceded that it is often the case, but I finally asked if he was wounded by some hypocrites at some point.  He smiled and said no.  I realized in an instant that he didn’t really care about hypocrisy.  He just used that as an excuse to feel superior to those awful, hypocritical Christians and to avoid God. 

These folks might want to reconsider the definition of hypocrisy as well.

a pretense of having a virtuous character, moral or religious beliefs or principles, etc., that one does not really possess.

The commenter in question insisted that to judge homosexual behavior as sinful was hypocritical if they didn’t give equal time to all other sins.  But that doesn’t meet the definition.  If one engages in homosexual behavior while speaking out against it then that would be hypocrisy.

Should Christians avoid hypocrisy?  Absolutely.  But we should point out when people try to silence us with silly logic.

If you don’t even understand the job description . . .

. . . you shouldn’t get the job.

All you need is 26 seconds to know that Sotomayar is unqualified:

This wasn’t some slip of the tongue or misstatement.  We should be charitable to anyone who makes an innocent misstatement and let them correct it.  But as one blogger put it, this was pure wink-wink-nudge-nudge.  She made no secret of how she really felt and the audience laughed along. 

Given her errors on the role of judges, she is not only unqualified to be a Supreme Court justice, she isn’t even qualified to judge a local dog show.  I mean that in the most literal sense.  Judges interpret laws, they don’t make them.  It couldn’t be more simple. 

I am the VP of an Internal Audit group.  We may make recommendations at times, but we don’t create the rules.  We just audit the organizations and see if they are in compliance.  It is a similar situation as with being a judge.  Different entities have different roles and responsibilities.  Things get really messed up in a hurry when one group does another group’s job.

I was very proud of my high school daughters when they read Obama’s views on judges and immediately realized he was 180 degrees from the truth.

Speaking at the Planned Parenthood conference in DC this afternoon, Barack Obama leveled harsh words at conservative Supreme Court justices, and he offered his own intention to appoint justices with “empathy.”Obama hinted that the court’s recent decision in Gonzales v. Carhart — which upheld a ban on partial-birth abortion — was part of “a concerted effort to steadily roll back” access to abortions. And he ridiculed Justice Anthony Kennedy, who wrote that case’s majority opinion. “Justice Kennedy knows many things,” he declared, “but my understanding is that he does not know how to be a doctor.”

Obama also won a laugh at the expense of Chief Justice John Roberts, saying that judgments of Roberts’ character during his confirmation hearings were largely superficial. “He loves his wife. He’s good to his dog,” he joked, adding that judicial philosophy should be weighted more seriously than such evaluations. “We need somebody who’s got the heart, the empathy, to recognize what it’s like to be a young teenage mom. The empathy to understand what it’s like to be poor, or African-American, or gay, or disabled, or old. And that’s the criteria by which I’m going to be selecting my judges.”

The Bumbling Genius has a great piece about the tragedy of this situation.  Check it out.

Side note: The news said she would make the sixth Catholic on the S.C.  No one seems to mind, though, because as a pro-abortionist she’s about as Catholic as I am. 

This is one of the greatest reasons the last election counted so much.  Shame on the Christians who voted for Obama.

Will she ultimately get nominated?  Sure, but the Republicans need to do their jobs and educate people on what judges are supposed to do.  One of Bush’s biggest failures was not communicating his message.  He could have stood up every week and explained why abortion is wrong, for example.

Judging is a two-way street

Only God truly knows the condition of someone’s heart.  People get mighty upset if a person’s professed Christianity is questioned.  Some of that is justified, but they miss a larger point: Many people will insist that someone is saved and not realize they are being just as judgmental.

Think about it: Claiming that someone isn’t saved implies that you know their heart.  But claiming someone is saved implies the same thing.  So a little consistency should be in order. 

By the way, despite myths to the contrary, Jesus never said not to judge.  He said not to judge hypocritically.

Matthew 7:1-5 “Do not judge, or you too will be judged. For in the same way you judge others, you will be judged, and with the measure you use, it will be measured to you. “Why do you look at the speck of sawdust in your brother’s eye and pay no attention to the plank in your own eye? How can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when all the time there is a plank in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the plank out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother’s eye.

Matthew 7:16-20 By their fruit you will recognize them. Do people pick grapes from thornbushes, or figs from thistles? Likewise every good tree bears good fruit, but a bad tree bears bad fruit. A good tree cannot bear bad fruit, and a bad tree cannot bear good fruit. Every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. Thus, by their fruit you will recognize them.

He tells us to judge, but it isn’t easy or perfectly accurate. 

2 Corinthians 11:13-15 For such men are false apostles, deceitful workmen, masquerading as apostles of Christ. And no wonder, for Satan himself masquerades as an angel of light. It is not surprising, then, if his servants masquerade as servants of righteousness. Their end will be what their actions deserve.

Christians are in a constant process of maturing, so we should not expect people to all be at the same stage.  But if they claim to be Christ-followers yet deny his teachings, have no interest in viewing the world and the Bible as He does, pick and choose the parts of the Bible they like, ignore correction and teach the opposite of what the Bible does on many issues, then what conclusions should you draw? 

There really is no way around making judgments.  The questions are whether they are well informed and what we do with them.