Tag Archives: founding fathers

Founders’ Fables – a terrific book to pass along key principles to children

A good friend of mine illustrated the book Founders’ Fables (his sister wrote it).  With easy to follow stories and catchy pictures, it teaches important principles held dear by the Founding Fathers and explains the concept and importance of limited government.

I bought a copy and was very impressed.

It is only $10 and would make a great gift for any child.  It would be great to have in public schools and I especially encourage home schoolers to get it.

From the web site:

What do Joe the Monkey, Benjamin Franklin, Holly the Hippo,
and Thomas Jefferson have in common?

They have all come together in this book to help explain our most treasured American values, based on the principles of our Founding Fathers and the concept of limited government. Through the use of funny and memorable characters, ten simple fables address these American values, often believed too complicated for kids to comprehend. Stories are introduced with a supporting quote from one of our nation’s founding fathers. Each fable is followed by age-appropriate questions and a short art activity to inspire your child to an even deeper understanding. Fun and colorful illustrations accompany each fable, written to appeal to children five years old and up. Through familiar quotations and a short biography, children will also become familiar with famous historical figures who played significant roles in the birth and early development of the United States.

Families concerned with maintaining our country’s conservative roots will want to commit these stories to heart, relating current events to the fables they will come to know and love.

Issues addressed in Founders’ Fables include:
  • National Debt and Future Generations
  • Private Enterprise and Government Intervention
  • Pork/Earmarking
  • Socialism
  • Eminent Domain
  • Outsourcing of American Businesses
  • Self-Reliance and Welfare
  • Government Intervention in Private Lives
  • Fairness Doctrine and Free Speech
  • Independence and Self-Reliance

Each fable is written in rhyme to encourage recall of the stories, and to appeal to a young child’s sense of rhythm and fun. Parents and teachers will agree that children have a fascination with rhyming stories and love to shout out the final rhyming word of each stanza. Many of us still remember every word of the rhyming books from our own childhood, and now share them with our own children…repeating them from memory and sharing in the love of those easily-recalled children’s stories. We hope Founders’ Fables will become a treasured part of your family’s library and tradition as well.

It’s never too early to instill a love and passion for the ideals of our Founding Fathers.
Prepare our future generation.
Encourage self-reliance.

Help preserve our heritage.

Fundy Founding Fathers?

This article about Faith of our Fathers at Stand to Reason gives a balanced perspective to the discussion of faith and politics.   

There is a canard that the Founding Fathers were predominately Deists and not Christians, but that view is not supported by the facts.  Here’s a key section:

It’s not necessary to dig through the diaries, however, to determine which faith was the Founder’s guiding light. There’s an easier way to settle the issue.

The phrase “Founding Fathers” is a proper noun. It refers to a specific group of men, the 55 delegates to the Constitutional Convention. There were other important players not in attendance, like Jefferson, whose thinking deeply influenced the shaping of our nation. These 55 Founding Fathers, though, made up the core.

The denominational affiliations of these men were a matter of public record. Among the delegates were 28 Episcopalians, 8 Presbyterians, 7 Congregationalists, 2 Lutherans, 2 Dutch Reformed, 2 Methodists, 2 Roman Catholics, 1 unknown, and only 3 deists–Williamson, Wilson, and Franklin–this at a time when church membership entailed a sworn public confession of biblical faith.

This is a revealing tally. It shows that the members of the Constitutional Convention, the most influential group of men shaping the political foundations of our nation, were almost all Christians, 51 of 55–a full 93%. Indeed, 70% were Calvinists (the Episcopalians, Presbyterians, and the Dutch Reformed), considered by some to be the most extreme and dogmatic form of Christianity.

What Did the Founding Fathers Believe and Value?
When you study the documents of the Revolutionary period, a precise picture comes into focus. Here it is:

  • Virtually all those involved in the founding enterprise were God-fearing men in the Christian sense; most were Calvinistic Protestants.
  • The Founders were deeply influenced by a biblical view of man and government. With a sober understanding of the fallenness of man, they devised a system of limited authority and checks and balances.
  • The Founders understood that fear of God, moral leadership, and a righteous citizenry were necessary for their great experiment to succeed.
  • Therefore, they structured a political climate that was encouraging to Christianity and accommodating to religion, rather than hostile to it.
  • Protestant Christianity was the prevailing religious view for the first 150 years of our history.

However…

  • The Fathers sought to set up a just society, not a Christian theocracy.
  • They specifically prohibited the establishment of Christianity–or any other faith–as the religion of our nation.

 Of course, the consequences and meaning of their faith on contemporary politics is a separate set of discussions.

Read the whole thing.  It is really quite good.