Tag Archives: Cambrian

Another Darwinian tautology

A tautology is an essentially meaningless statement where all instances are true, such as, “It will rain today or it won’t.”  Much of Darwinian evolution “evidence” falls into this category.

Here’s the latest, via Don’t ask us how the most complex eyes appeared at the beginning. Instead, we offer to solve a tautology for you, about the yes of some Early Cambrian arthropods that predate other finds by 85 million years (i.e., they are very early fossils):

“The arrangement and size of the lenses indicate that these eyes belonged to an active predator that was capable of seeing in low light. The eyes are more complex than those known from contemporaneous trilobites and are as advanced as those of many living forms.”

. . .

They provide further evidence that the Cambrian explosion involved rapid innovation in fine-scale anatomy as well as gross morphology, and are consistent with the concept that the development of advanced vision helped to drive this great evolutionary event.

Did you catch that?  If you were a high school student who trusted your teachers, you’d think they had evidence for this unbelievably rapid amount of highly complex change.  But they merely assume that it evolved, so it “had” to have been a great evolutionary event and another example of “rapid innovation.”